Swept Path Analysis

Do you or your project team need swept path analysis whilst designing a new access / parking layout / internal driveway or path arrangements?

Do you need vehicle tracking to assess the feasibility of a potential site’s suitability for redevelopment or change of use?

Have you been asked by a Local Planning Authority for swept path analysis / tracking for construction vehicles as part of a Construction Logistics Plan or for servicing vehicles as part of a Delivery Servicing Plan?

If so Kronen can assist using Autodesk’s AutoCAD and Vehicle Tracking software.

Swept path analysis / vehicle tracking assess the space envelop of a vehicle’s body and wheels when performing a manoeuvre.

swept path analysis with vehicle tracking, autodesk logo.

Swept Path Analysis / Vehicle Tracking in British Planning

Swept path analysis / vehicle tracking is now a well established element of good street and development design; this is clear from Manual for Streets (p.81, DCLG & DfT, 2007):

“Swept path analysis, or tracking, is used to determine the space required for various vehicles and is a key tool for designing carriageways for vehicular movement within the overall layout of the street. The potential layouts of buildings and spaces do not have to be dictated by carriageway alignment – they should generally be considered first, with the carriageway alignment being designed to fit within the remaining space.

The use of computer-aided design (CAD) tracking models and similar techniques often proves to be beneficial in determining how the street will operate and how vehicles will move within it. Layouts designed using this approach enable buildings to be laid out to suit the character of the street, with footways and kerbs helping to define and emphasise spaces. Designers have the freedom to vary the space between kerbs or buildings. The kerb line does not need to follow the line of vehicle tracking if careful attention is given to the combination of sightlines, parking and pedestrian movements.”